Student Learning Outcomes: History

US History I

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze cultural interactions and differences in North America from the 15th to the 19th century.
  2. Explain intellectual and religious development in a national and transnational context.
  3. Compare ideas and events related to ideas of race, federalism, economic and geographic expansionism and sectionalism.
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship.
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge.

Developed: 2016-2017

US History II

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze the changing relationship of the United States with the rest of the world.
  2. Explain the centralization and decentralization of economic and political influences.
  3. Identify and compare the movements and interactions of people, technology, ideas and culture in a national and transnational context.
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship.
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge.

Developed: 2016-2017

World Civilization I

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze western and non‐western societies and cultures, and their human and physical geography, with a significant emphasis on non‐western regions.
  2. Summarize the emergence of human societies including features of urban life, empires and crosscultural interaction and trade
  3. Assess the development and exchange of science, technology, religion and intellectual thought.
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship.
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge.

Developed: 2016-2017

World Civilization II

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze western and non‐western societies and cultures, and their human and physical geography, with a significant emphasis on non‐western regions.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the processes of state‐building, colonization and decolonization.
  3. Assess the development and exchange of science, technology, religion and intellectual thought.
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship.
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge.

Developed: 2016-2017

Western Civilization I

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze western societies and cultures, and their human and physical geography.   
  2. Summarize the emergence of human societies including features of urban life, empires and cross-cultural interaction and trade
  3. Assess the development and exchange of science, technology, religion and intellectual thought
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge

Developed: 2017-2018

Western Civilization II

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze western societies and cultures, and their human and physical geography.    
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the processes of state-building, colonization and decolonization
  3. Assess the development and exchange of science, technology, religion and intellectual thought
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge

Developed: 2017-2018

Meetings & Events

Oct 15

Academic Affairs Committee Meeting

Oct 15

Strategic Planning Committee Meeting

Oct 15

Fiscal and Administrative Policy Committee Meeting

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