Student Learning Outcomes: Political Science

US Government

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the historical and philosophical origins of the American government.
  2. Analyze the organization, powers and operations of the three branches of government.
  3. Appraise the various forms of political participation and the evolution of the American political process.
  4. Identify the origins and changing relationship between the federal government and the states through a discussion of current public policy issues.
  5. Describe and appraise the relationship between the federal government and the American people in regard to their civil liberties and civil rights, as well as their access to public benefits and services.

Developed: 2016-2017

Comparitive Government

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the historical and political origins of modern nations.
  2. Summarize and assess the impact of a nation’s past on its modern governmental structures.
  3. Understand the relationship between the state and society, the role of culture in shaping this relationship, and the way such relationships differ from one country to another.
  4. Appraise the role of political parties and elections in selected western and non-western nations.
  5. Explain the contributions of various political thinkers to the evolution of modern nations.

Developed: 2016-2017

State & Local Government

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the historical and political origins of the American city.
  2. Differentiate the organization, powers and operations of the three branches of government at the federal, state and local levels.
  3. Explain and assess the origins and changing relationship between the federal, state and local governments.
  4. Appraise the various forms of political participation and the evolution of the American political process.
  5. Analyze the evolution of rural, urban and suburban America through a discussion of current public policy issues.

Developed: 2016-2017

International Relations

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain and apply the concepts needed for understanding international relations, including nation-state, sovereignty, conflict and cooperation.
  2. Evaluate and analyze the role of political and social forces in shaping institutions of governance and foreign policies.
  3. Differentiate the dominant approaches to understanding international relations, including realism and liberalism, and use those approaches to analyze issues of international concern.
  4. Evaluate the importance of diversity and ethics, as expressed in cultures, societies and judicial systems, in shaping international relations.
  5. Understand the role of major global institutions and organizations.

Developed: 2016-2017

Meetings & Events

Oct 15

Academic Affairs Committee Meeting

Oct 15

Strategic Planning Committee Meeting

Oct 15

Fiscal and Administrative Policy Committee Meeting

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