Student Learning Outcomes: Sociology

Introduction to Sociology

Course Objectives: Pick three out of five

  1. Apply your sociological imagination.
  2. Contrast the various sociological methodologies, including their strengths and weaknesses.
  3. Describe the major theoretical perspectives of sociology and utilize these theories to examine various course topics.
  4. Examine and explain systems of stratification.
  5. Critically apply the concepts discussed to issues in your life and the world.

Developed: 2016-2017

Social Problems

Course Objectives: Pick three out of five

  1. Recognize the basic sociological concepts and methods for studying social problems.
  2. Identify the various persistent and widespread social problems in contemporary American Society.
  3. Develop the ability to identify, define, and investigate social problems.
  4. Evaluate the effectiveness of existing social policy intended to address social problems.
  5. Explain the impact social problems have on individuals and groups utilizing intersectional analysis.

Developed: 2016-2017

Families/Marriage and Family/Sociology of the Family

Course Objectives: Pick three out of five

  1. Apply key sociological concepts and theories to the study of families.
  2. Recognize the socially constructed nature and diversity of family structures, rights, and rituals across times and cultures.
  3. Analyze how race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and age each contribute (separately or intersectionally) to family life.
  4. Examine the impact social forces and policy changes have on families.
  5. Critically discuss social problems that influence family dynamics and the positions of families and their members in society.

Developed: 2016-2017

Race and Ethnicity/Race and Ethnic Relations

Course Objectives: Pick four out of six

  1. Utilize sociological definitions of and theoretical approaches to race and ethnicity.
  2. Analyze how racism, prejudice, and discrimination are embedded in all levels of society.
  3. Recognize that race and ethnicity are historically, culturally, and socially bound and constructed.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge pertaining to the creation and fluidity of racial and ethnic identities.
  5. Critically examine the privileges that accompany whiteness.
  6. Integrate intersectional research approaches that account for race and ethnicity combining with other personal descriptors such as gender, age, and sexuality.

Developed: 2016-2017

Meetings & Events

Oct 15

Academic Affairs Committee Meeting

Oct 15

Strategic Planning Committee Meeting

Oct 15

Fiscal and Administrative Policy Committee Meeting

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