Nature


Strategic Initiatives

MassTransfer Foundational
Learning Outcomes

Overview

These learning outcomes for fundational courses ensure that students develop the same knowledge and skills that will be required when they transfer to or continue to matriculate within a four year institution.

Contact

Bob Awkward
Director of Learning Outcomes Assessment
(617) 994-6908
rawkward@dhe.mass.edu

Duration

2012 – Present

Related Data

 

 

Target Populations
DHE Responsibilities
  • Transfer
Partnerships

Multiple Campuses

Related Initiatives

MassTransfer Pathways

Background

Disciplined-based faculty from the three segments (i.e., community colleges, state universities, and the UMass System) worked together to identify foundational courses that represent the first two years of study in the discipline, and that our campuses will accept and count towards the completion of a baccalaureate degree. This was the critical groundwork that undergirds the Commonwealth Commitment. The next vital step in that process is the development of learning outcomes for the foundational courses. These learning outcomes ensure that whether a course is taken at a community college, a state university, or the University of Massachusetts system, the learning outcomes are the same. Of course, how the faculty member achieves those learning outcomes is up to them based on their contractual right to academic freedom.

The notion of learning outcomes is critical to all of our work to continually improve the quality of teaching and student learning. The DHE has long been a national leader in advancing a culture of learning outcomes assessment throughout public higher education. Given the growing clamor for increased accountability, DHE became acutely aware that we needed to develop ways to assess learning outcomes of our undergraduates using authentic student artifacts. Further, we also recognized that the best assessment of student learning outcomes derives from our faculty.

Thus, it is important to develop and promulgate the use of common learning outcomes for the foundational courses to ensure that students are developing the same knowledge and skills that will be required when they transfer to or continue to matriculate within a four year institution.

Foundational Learning Outcomes by Discipline

The following are the foundational learning outcomes by discipline have been distributed to chief academic officers at all public institutions of higher education to be distributed to and utilized by deans, department chairs, and faculty at the classroom level.

For the disciplined-based faculty who developed these learning outcomes, please refer to this list. These outcomes were also vetted by the MassTransfer Pathways discipline-based faculty members across all segments.

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the characteristics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their life cycles.
  2. Explain the importance of different biological macromolecules, including the mechanism of their synthesis, and their roles in the cells of all organisms.
  3. Summarize how cells acquire, store and release energy through metabolic pathways.
  4. Describe the processes (including genetic manipulation technologies) by which heritable material is passed on to the next generation.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the characteristics, including homeostatic and reproductive strategies, of different organisms across the kingdoms of life.
  2. Recognize and explain the causes of large evolutionary trends in biodiversity, and how cladistics inform phylogeny.
  3. Explain the processes and outcomes of macro and microevolution, including mutations.
  4. Explain organismal interactions at the levels of populations, communities, ecosystems, and biosphere.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate competency with the scientific techniques used in the exploration of introductory biology examples may include careful observation, sketching, microscopy, volumetric measurements, dissection,micropipetting, spectrophotometry, and/or modeling).
  2. Using the scientific method design controlled experiments with testable hypotheses.
  3. Collect data and create graphs or other visual representations in a clear and logical fashion that may include statistics.
  4. Interpret meaning of experimental results in a broader scientific context.
  5. Communicate results of lab experiments applying broad scientific context (primary literature) utilizing clear and effective written and verbal skills.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Set up and perform basic stoichiometric calculations.
  2. Judge if answers obtained from calculations are chemically reasonable.
  3. Predict products and energy changes of simple chemical reactions.
  4. Utilize chemical terminology to explain chemical and physical processes at a molecular level.
  5. Utilize basic chemical scientific terminology to describe and explain chemical and physical processes at a molecular level in order to predict macroscopic properties of matter.
  6. Predict atomic and molecular structure and chemical periodicity using principles of quantum chemistry.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Predict the impact of intermolecular forces on physical properties of molecules and solutions.
  2. Assess the rate and order of a reaction.
  3. Evaluate reaction mechanisms.
  4. Distinguish whether a reaction is spontaneous using entropy and Gibb’s energy.
  5. Analyze chemical equilibria in a quantitative and qualitative manner.
  6. Evaluate the properties of acids and bases and their effects on pH.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize knowledge of hazards and safe handling of chemicals to work safely in the lab.
  2. Complete chemical experiments in response to a question/hypothesis.
  3. Record accurate observations and measurements of physical and chemical processes.
  4. Collect qualitative and quantitative data in a logically organized and clear fashion.
  5. Analyze collected data.
  6. Interpret collected data.
  7. Report results in a logically organized and clear fashion.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this two course sequence, students will be able to:

  1. Determine appropriate Lewis structures and formal charges for organic molecules, including hybridization, geometry, and 3D structure.
  2. Interpret and apply standard conventions for drawing organic molecules.
  3. Name organic molecules using IUPAC convention.
  4. Apply principles of conformational analysis to acyclic and cyclic organic molecules.
  5. Determine configuration of stereocenters and relationships of chiral structures.
  6. Employ pKa values and structural effects to determine acid strength and direction of acid/base equilibria.
  7. Evaluate reaction feasibility using kinetic and thermodynamic data.
  8. Predict products of organic reactions.
  9. Draw reasonable arrow‐pushing mechanisms to show movement of electrons for organic reactions.
  10. Interpret spectra from Infrared Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and Mass Spectrometry to determine structural features and/or molecular structure.
  11. Draw resonance structures and apply them to conjugation, aromaticity, and molecular stability.
  12. Propose a sequence of reactions to synthesize target molecules from simple organic building blocks

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize knowledge of hazards and safe handling of chemicals to work safely in the lab.
  2. Complete chemical experiments to perform techniques or synthesize organic molecules.
  3. Calculate theoretical and percent yield.
  4. Collect and record data in a logically organized and clear fashion.
  5. Analyze and interpret data.
  6. Characterize organic molecules using physical and spectroscopic data.
  7. Critically evaluate outcomes of the experiment based on data collected.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain concepts related to models of human communication
  2. Compare and contrast the communication process in a variety of different contexts
  3. Explain the various theoretical perspectives from which communication may be studied
  4. Explain perception and the role it plays in the communication process
  5. Examine the effects of gender roles and cultural influences on communication
  6. Evaluate verbal and nonverbal communication
  7. Differentiate between hearing and listening
  8. Analyze ethical issues related to human communication
  9. Recognize elements of group dynamics and leadership qualities
  10. Evaluate public communication and rhetoric

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate competence in interpersonal communication contexts.
  2. Identify aspects of self-concept and how it changes over time
  3. Explain perception and the role it plays in the communication process
  4. Examine the effects of gender roles and cultural influences on communication
  5. Describe the stages of relationship development
  6. Identify behaviors that contribute to confirming and disconfirming climates
  7. Demonstrate knowledge and skill in managing conflict

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course (or a similarly structured course), students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in composition, movement, editing, sound, and production design
  2. Demonstrate competence in developments in screen narrative
  3. Explain and articulate film’s relation to other arts and media
  4. Identify film’s role as an instrument of social expression

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course (or a similarly structured course), students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in foundational concepts in media theory and media studies
  2. Develop the vocabulary to discuss and contextualize (a) media and culture, (b) media power, (c) media systems and practices, and (d) media representation as a political and symbolic process in the United States
  3. Explain the interplay of structure and agency in media systems and social action.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze how a market system allocates its resources and produces goods and services for an economic unit using supply and demand.
  2. Evaluate national income accounting.
  3. Identify macroeconomics conditions, specifically business cycle variables (GDP, unemployment, inflation).
  4. Develop the ability to distinguish between fiscal and monetary policy.
  5. Recommend appropriate policy options to achieve macroeconomic goals.
  6. Evaluate the role and functions of financial institutions and the Federal Reserve.
  7. Analyze different economic systems, the respective role of government within each and their respective strengths and weaknesses.
  8. Develop a basic competency regarding global economic relationships.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze how a market system allocates its resources and produces goods and services for an economic unit using supply and demand.
  2. Analyze firms' behavior with respect to elasticity, production, pricing, maximizing profits, and minimizing costs.
  3. Analyze consumer behavior with respect to how market forces along with costs and benefits determine choice.
  4. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a market system with respect to the efficiency and equity of market outcomes.
  5. Differentiate the outcomes of different market structures.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Close Reading Skills: Demonstrate comprehension of texts, reflective reading skills, and the close reading skills of literary analysis.
  2. Content Knowledge: Analyze and interpret works of literature from several periods of American literary history, such as the colonial period, the transcendentalist period, or the Harlem Renaissance.
  3. Connecting Literature to Its Contexts: Analyze the complex interrelationships between authors, texts, and specific cultural, aesthetic, social, political, and historical contexts
  4. Academic Writing Skills: Plan and write essays that have clear theses with arguments that go beyond summary; that use accurate and sufficient evidence presented in a scholarly manner; and, where appropriate, that employ proper disciplinary and interdisciplinary research tools.
  5. Development of Literary Vocabulary: Interpret works of literature using the disciplinary vocabulary of literary study, such as concepts and terms relating to genre, style, tropes, conceits, forms, narratives, and theories of literature and culture.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

Core Course Component 1:

  1. Close Reading Skills: Demonstrate comprehension of texts, reflective reading skills, and the close reading skills of literary analysis.
  2. Content Knowledge: Analyze and interpret works of literature from several periods of British literary history, such as the medieval period, the Renaissance, the Victorian era, or the Modernist era.
  3. Development of Literary Vocabulary: Interpret works of literature using the disciplinary vocabulary of literary study, such as concepts and terms relating to genre, style, tropes, conceits, forms, narratives, and theories of literature and culture. 
  4. Academic Writing Skills: Plan and write essays that have clear theses with arguments that go beyond summary; that use accurate and sufficient evidence presented in a scholarly manner; and, where appropriate, that employ proper disciplinary and interdisciplinary research tools.
  5. Connecting Literature to Its Contexts: Analyze the complex interrelationships between authors, texts, and specific cultural, aesthetic, social, political, and historical contexts.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

Core Course Component 1:

  1. Close Reading Skills: Demonstrate comprehension of texts and reflective reading skills.
  2. Critical Thinking Skills: Learning Outcome: Students who complete this course should be able to interpret and analyze various texts.
  3. Clear Written Communication: Students who complete this course should be able to produce clearly written prose using appropriate conventions for a given purpose and audience.
  4. Use of the Writing Process: Use a writing process that includes pre-writing, drafting, feedback, and revision to produce polished pieces of writing.
  5. Beginning Research Skills, Including Summarizing, Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Synthesizing Source Materials: Produce texts that include direct quotations, paraphrases, and synthesis of sources.
  6. Appropriate Use of Documentation: Use an appropriate documentation style consistently and correctly to cite sources and maintain academic integrity.
  7. Rhetorical Awareness: Recognize rhetorical strategies such as writing for an audience, with a purpose, and within conventions of a genre, and incorporate them appropriately in their writing.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

Core Course Component 1:

  1. Close Reading Skills: Apply active and critical reading skills to analyze and synthesize a variety of texts.
  2. Critical Thinking Skills: Interpret and analyze various texts and construct well-reasoned prose.
  3. Academic Writing Fluency: Create texts that appropriately reflect the conventions of academic writing.
  4. Use of the Writing Process: Use a writing process that includes prewriting, drafting, feedback, and revision to produce polished, rhetorically effective pieces of writing. 
  5. Research Skills, Including Locating, Evaluating, Summarizing and Synthesizing Primary and Secondary Sources: Compose a research-based argument by locating, evaluating, summarizing, quoting, paraphrasing, and synthesizing a variety of primary and secondary sources.
  6. Appropriate Use of Documentation: Apply an appropriate documentation style and use it consistently and correctly to cite sources and maintain academic integrity.
  7. Employment of Rhetorical Strategies: Select and employ rhetorical strategies appropriate for different purposes and audiences.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

Core Course Component 1:

  1. Close Reading Skills: Demonstrate comprehension of texts, reflective reading skills, and the close reading skills of literary analysis. 
  2. Content Knowledge: Analyze and interpret works of literature from one or more global (non-British, non-American) literary cultures, such as East Asian, Caribbean, South Asian, or African literatures.
  3. Development of Literary Vocabulary: Interpret works of literature using the disciplinary vocabulary of literary study, such as concepts and terms relating to genre, style, tropes, conceits, forms, narratives, and theories of literature and culture. 
  4. Academic Writing Skills: Plan and write essays that have clear theses with arguments that go beyond summary; that use accurate and sufficient evidence presented in a scholarly manner; and, where appropriate, that employ proper disciplinary and interdisciplinary research tools.
  5. Connecting Literature to Its Contexts: Analyze the complex interrelationships between authors, texts, and specific cultural, aesthetic, social, political, and historical contexts.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze cultural interactions and differences in North America from the 15th to the 19th century.
  2. Explain intellectual and religious development in a national and transnational context.
  3. Compare ideas and events related to ideas of race, federalism, economic and geographic expansionism and sectionalism.
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship.
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze the changing relationship of the United States with the rest of the world.
  2. Explain the centralization and decentralization of economic and political influences.
  3. Identify and compare the movements and interactions of people, technology, ideas and culture in a national and transnational context.
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship.
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze western and non‐western societies and cultures, and their human and physical geography, with a significant emphasis on non‐western regions.
  2. Summarize the emergence of human societies including features of urban life, empires and crosscultural interaction and trade
  3. Assess the development and exchange of science, technology, religion and intellectual thought.
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship.
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze western and non‐western societies and cultures, and their human and physical geography, with a significant emphasis on non‐western regions.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the processes of state‐building, colonization and decolonization.
  3. Assess the development and exchange of science, technology, religion and intellectual thought.
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship.
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze western societies and cultures, and their human and physical geography.   
  2. Summarize the emergence of human societies including features of urban life, empires and cross-cultural interaction and trade
  3. Assess the development and exchange of science, technology, religion and intellectual thought
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze western societies and cultures, and their human and physical geography.    
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the processes of state-building, colonization and decolonization
  3. Assess the development and exchange of science, technology, religion and intellectual thought
  4. Use critical thinking to evaluate historical sources and scholarship
  5. Explain how evidence is analyzed and used to construct historical knowledge

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the historical and philosophical origins of the American government.
  2. Analyze the organization, powers and operations of the three branches of government.
  3. Appraise the various forms of political participation and the evolution of the American political process.
  4. Identify the origins and changing relationship between the federal government and the states through a discussion of current public policy issues.
  5. Describe and appraise the relationship between the federal government and the American people in regard to their civil liberties and civil rights, as well as their access to public benefits and services.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the historical and political origins of modern nations.
  2. Summarize and assess the impact of a nation’s past on its modern governmental structures.
  3. Understand the relationship between the state and society, the role of culture in shaping this relationship, and the way such relationships differ from one country to another.
  4. Appraise the role of political parties and elections in selected western and non-western nations.
  5. Explain the contributions of various political thinkers to the evolution of modern nations.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the historical and political origins of the American city.
  2. Differentiate the organization, powers and operations of the three branches of government at the federal, state and local levels.
  3. Explain and assess the origins and changing relationship between the federal, state and local governments.
  4. Appraise the various forms of political participation and the evolution of the American political process.
  5. Analyze the evolution of rural, urban and suburban America through a discussion of current public policy issues.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain and apply the concepts needed for understanding international relations, including nation-state, sovereignty, conflict and cooperation.
  2. Evaluate and analyze the role of political and social forces in shaping institutions of governance and foreign policies.
  3. Differentiate the dominant approaches to understanding international relations, including realism and liberalism, and use those approaches to analyze issues of international concern.
  4. Evaluate the importance of diversity and ethics, as expressed in cultures, societies and judicial systems, in shaping international relations.
  5. Understand the role of major global institutions and organizations.

Developed: 2016-2017

Note: The American Psychological Association (2013) provides guidelines for the undergraduate psychology major and, in those guidelines, outlines 5 learning goals for the major. Introduction to Psychology is a foundational course within the major and, as such, upon completion of the course students will be able to exhibit basic competencies within each of the five areas.

APA Goal 1: Knowledge Base in Psychology

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge and comprehension of the major psychological concepts, theoretical perspectives, historical trends, and empirical findings.
  2. Discuss how psychological principles apply to psychological problems.

APA Goal 2: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking

  1. Explain why psychology is a science in which ideas are tested and critically evaluated.
  2. Demonstrate awareness of the ethical principles that govern psychological research and practice.

APA Goal 3: Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World

  1. Describe the impact of culture on individuals.

APA Goal 4: Communication

  1. Communicate ideas used in psychology through oral or written work.
  2. Demonstrate basic psychology information literacy, such as through the ability to identify when specific information is needed, a knowledge of where to find information and the ability to evaluate the information that is identified.

APA Goal 5: Professional Development

  1. Recognize different psychological specialties, career options and applications to other fields of study..

Developed: 2016-2017

Note: These student learning outcomes are largely based on the American Psychological Association (2013) guidelines for the undergraduate psychology major Goal 2: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking, and to a lesser extent, Goal 3: Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World.

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Communicate the value of the scientific method and evidence‐based inquiry, as compared to other forms of inquiry.
  2. Use scientific reasoning to interpret, design, conduct and/or critique basic psychological research, using concepts such as: research design; reliability; validity; sampling; and appropriate statistics and their graphical representation, e.g., descriptive statistics and inferential statistics that compare groups or establish correlation.
  3. Apply the ethical principles that psychology researchers in the field abide by.
  4. Demonstrate psychology information literacy, including how to find psychology sources, how to evaluate the quality of the source and effectively summarize the information that is accessed.
  5. Demonstrate competence in writing using APA style, including ability to write a persuasive scientific argument and present information using a scientific approach.

Developed: 2016-2017

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the major theories and approaches to cognition.
  2. Explain basic principles of cognition, such as memory, attention, language, and decision-making.
  3. Describe and critique some of the major research designs used in cognitive psychology, including ways in which cognitive processes are operationalized.
  4. Identify how internal cognitive mechanisms are affected by external environmental contexts.
  5. Articulate some of the cognitive mechanisms that occur in day-to-day life and how they affect behavior.
  6. Explain how cognitive psychology can be applied and integrated with other fields of psychology, such as clinical, physiological, or developmental psychology.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify mental illness as a social construct that has changed over time.
  2. Provide examples across several types of disorders of the current Diagnostic Manual criteria that classify disorders: a) disturbance b) distress, c) dysfunction and d) danger that they may cause an individual.
  3. Identify the ways in which a range of theoretical perspectives (e.g., biological, psychodynamic, sociocultural etc. might explain the etiology and treatment of the same disorder.
  4. Discuss the methods that psychologists use to both investigate the etiology of mental illness and evaluate the effectiveness of treatment options.
  5. Identify examples of the intersections that exist between stress (introduced by either temporary or chronic situations) and physical and mental health and illness.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate and apply an understanding of the major developmental theories, with an emphasis on conception through middle childhood.
  2. Critique the various methods of investigation used in developmental psychology research studies.
  3. Explain basic principles of physical, cognitive, social and emotional development from conception through middle childhood, including differentiation of typical and atypical developmental pathways.
  4. Explain, from a global perspective how cultural, economic, political, and historical contexts affect children’s development.
  5. Describe some of the major social issues, changes, and transitions that affect children, families, schools and communities.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Critically evaluate the major theories related to the study of adolescent development with an emphasis on preteen to early adulthood.
  2. Demonstrate comprehension of the biological, cognitive, social and emotional changes that occur during adolescence including how the interactions among those domains contribute to outcomes during adolescence.
  3. Identify individual and contextual influences on adolescent development, including issues related to culture, gender, sexuality, race, social status, and social context.
  4. Demonstrate comprehension of how adolescents are influenced by, and have changing roles within, their families, peer groups, schools, and communities.
  5. Identify how cultural, economic, political, and historical contexts affect development during adolescence, and explain the importance of a global perspective.
  6. Critically apply research and theory related to contemporary issues facing adolescents.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Use descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations) and frequency distributions.
  2. Discuss the meaning of both a statistically significant outcome and a nonsignificant outcome.
  3. Interpret basic inferential statistics of Z scores and comparisons of data to a normal distribution.
  4. Interpret the outcome of statistical tests that compare multiple groups (t tests, ANOVA’s) as well as situations in which the influence of more than one variable is evaluated.
  5. Explain what correlational data can and cannot indicate about the relationships that may exist between two or more variables.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the key concepts associated with the major personality theories (such as, Freud and Neo-Freudian Theories, Feminist Theories, Behaviorism, Humanism, Cognitive Theories, Trait Theories, Sociocultural and Non-Western Theories).
  2. Explain the research methodologies used in the science of personality psychology. Identify the characteristics of some common personality tests.
  3. Analyze case studies using a number of personality theories.
  4. Explain the impact of cultural differences and diversity (such as, ethnicity, gender, social attitudes, and customs) in personality constructs.

Developed: 2017-2018

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the major anatomical landmarks of the human brain and the basic functions of each of the landmark areas.
  2. Identify the ways in which neurons interact with each other, including both the electrical activity and neurotransmission.
  3. Identify across both subcortical and cortical levels the ways in which areas of the brain influence behavior and the ways in which the brain interprets input from the external world.
  4. Discuss the methods used to investigate the brain’s anatomy and physiology acknowledging the ethical concerns that face neuroscientists who use human participants or animal models.
  5. Discuss examples of dysfunction of the nervous system related to anatomical or physiological changes.

Developed: 2017-2018

Note: These student learning outcomes are organized in relation to the American Psychological Association (2013) guidelines for the undergraduate psychology major, in particular, Goal 3, Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World.

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain key concepts in social psychology, such as: social cognition; social perception; the self; attitudes; stereotyping; prejudice and discrimination; interpersonal relationships; group dynamics; social influence; prosocial behavior and aggression; conformity; the self-serving bias; the fundamental attribution error; and cognitive dissonance.
  2. Discuss the significance of historic and contemporary scientific research and methods used in this field, including ethical concerns and legal issues.
  3. Explain the relationship between culture, social behavior, and social thinking that can directly and indirectly result in different behaviors and attributions about behavior.
  4. Demonstrate comprehension of how various key social psychology themes, theories, and concepts apply to everyday living and current world problems

Developed: 2017-2018

Course Objectives: Pick three out of five

  1. Apply your sociological imagination.
  2. Contrast the various sociological methodologies, including their strengths and weaknesses.
  3. Describe the major theoretical perspectives of sociology and utilize these theories to examine various course topics.
  4. Examine and explain systems of stratification.
  5. Critically apply the concepts discussed to issues in your life and the world.

Developed: 2016-2017

Course Objectives: Pick three out of five

  1. Recognize the basic sociological concepts and methods for studying social problems.
  2. Identify the various persistent and widespread social problems in contemporary American Society.
  3. Develop the ability to identify, define, and investigate social problems.
  4. Evaluate the effectiveness of existing social policy intended to address social problems.
  5. Explain the impact social problems have on individuals and groups utilizing intersectional analysis.

Developed: 2016-2017

Course Objectives: Pick three out of five

  1. Apply key sociological concepts and theories to the study of families.
  2. Recognize the socially constructed nature and diversity of family structures, rights, and rituals across times and cultures.
  3. Analyze how race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and age each contribute (separately or intersectionally) to family life.
  4. Examine the impact social forces and policy changes have on families.
  5. Critically discuss social problems that influence family dynamics and the positions of families and their members in society.

Developed: 2016-2017

Course Objectives: Pick four out of six

  1. Utilize sociological definitions of and theoretical approaches to race and ethnicity.
  2. Analyze how racism, prejudice, and discrimination are embedded in all levels of society.
  3. Recognize that race and ethnicity are historically, culturally, and socially bound and constructed.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge pertaining to the creation and fluidity of racial and ethnic identities.
  5. Critically examine the privileges that accompany whiteness.
  6. Integrate intersectional research approaches that account for race and ethnicity combining with other personal descriptors such as gender, age, and sexuality.

Developed: 2016-2017