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Go Higher! Discover Your Community Colleges, State Universities & UMass Campuses

  • Go Higher Logo

    What is Go Higher?

    Go Higher! promotes college readiness and raises awareness of the growing number of outstanding programs and opportunities available to students at our community colleges, state universities and UMass campuses.

    Go Higher! is a campaign by the Department of Higher Education, in partnership with Massachusetts' 29 public colleges and universities, to raise awareness of the growing number of outstanding programs and opportunities available to students at our community colleges, state universities and UMass campuses.

  • Photo of Boyden Hall at Bridgewater State University

    Bridgewater State University special education program ranks nationally

    The special education program at Bridgewater State University recently earned a top 10 national ranking from Teacher.org

    In its annual Best Colleges in Education Special Education rankings, Teacher.org used graduation rates, size of program, default rates and affordability among its criteria as it analyzed more than 400 colleges and universities across the nation that offer special education degrees.

    Through its College of Education and Allied Studies, Bridgewater State University offers special education degrees at both the bachelor’s and master’s degree levels and, in the Teacher.org ranking, rated number six in the nation.

    “We are thrilled to learn of this prestigious ranking,” said Lisa Battaglino, dean of the College of Education and Allied Studies. “Bridgewater is one of America’s oldest teacher education institutions, and with this strong foundation, we continue as leader in educator preparation.”

    With a graduation rate of 62.16 percent, a percent of program graduates out of all graduates per year score of 31.46 and a tuition affordability score of 40.07, Bridgewater became only one of 20 institutions named to the special education list. Teachers.org also rated top programs in early childhood education, educational leadership, elementary education and master’s in education using Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System survey files.

    “Undergraduates at Bridgewater are encouraged to be passionate about their chosen vocation of special education teachers, as the field is still in need of dedicated individuals ready to teach special populations in a contemporary classroom environment,” according to the listing on Teacher.org.

    The Department of Special Education offers a Bachelor of Science in Education in special education, a five-year dual licensure program — Bachelor of Science in elementary education, Master of Education in special education, a minor in special education and Master of Education in special education.

    Graduates of the program pursue careers as special education teachers in public and private schools, counselors, consultants and school administrators.

    Bridgewater State University special education program ranks nationally - Wicked Local Bridgewater

  • Massasoit Campus from above

    Grant gives Massasoit region's first vet tech school

    Massasoit's Canton campus received $442,000 from the state to construct a facility for the first vet tech program in Southeastern Massachusetts

    This region is one of the most lucrative places in the country to be a veterinary technician, but it’s also an area with no vet tech school. Massasoit Community College will change that this year, thanks in part to a $442,000 grant from the state.

    On Monday at the State House, Sen. Marc Pacheco (D - Taunton) announced a $442,517 Skills Capital Grant to outfit a vet tech clinical instructional facility on the Massasoit Community College Canton campus. The facility broke ground on construction in June.

    Citing the “utmost importance” of workforce training for Southeastern Massachusetts and the state as a whole, Pacheco said the vet tech program will help students interested in STEM and Animal Science get the practical education they need to succeed in these fields.

    “We must ensure that individuals can develop and improve skills to meet the needs of our Commonwealth’s economy,” Pacheco said. “The success and vibrancy of our communities depend on it.”

    The new vet tech program, which last fall began enrolling its first students, targets high school seniors or recent high school graduates, including students currently enrolled at Norfolk County Agricultural High School with whom the program has a dual enrollment articulation.

    The program is also open to current vet techs who may be displaced without licensure, and un-employed or under-employed adults looking to make a living wage in the animal health care industry.

    According to May 2015 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, vet techs in the Brockton-Bridgewater-Easton area are some of the highest-paid in the country, with an annual median wage of $46,670 compared to the national annual median wage of $33,280.

    “The rapidly expanding animal health care industry has created a distinct need for Veterinary Technicians,” Massasoit President Charles Wall said Monday. “The career opportunities available to graduates of this program are varied and in-demand, and we are excited to provide training that helps address a regional need.”

    There are currently five vet tech schools in Massachusetts, but none in the Southeastern part of the state.

    Mount Ida College, in Newton, houses the closest vet tech program.

    The instructional facility on the Massasoit Canton campus will include a surgical suite and a digital radiology room, and it will house dogs and cats for students to gain hands-on training of surgical prep, imaging, examinations, and animal care.

    The facility will cost $1.4 million in total, according to a Monday press release from Pacheco’s office.

    The grant will help outfit the space with state-of-the-art equipment, and will allow the school to provide additional training opportunities, a spokesperson from Massasoit said.

    The facility will be managed by a certified veterinary technician, who will work closely with our assistant professor of veterinary medicine, who is a licensed veterinarian. Students in the program and part time animal care attendants will help provide coverage at the facility as well.

    Grant gives Massasoit region's first vet tech school - The Enterprise

  • Students work together at a laptop

    UMass Amherst gets $15 million for cybersecurity program

    University of Massachusetts Amherst’s computer science programs are about to enjoy a growth spurt, thanks to a $15 million grant from a foundation established by the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co.

    University of Massachusetts Amherst’s computer science programs are about to enjoy a growth spurt, thanks to a $15 million grant from a foundation established by the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co., better known as MassMutual.

    The MassMutual Foundation will donate the money over 10 years, with $12 million going to the university’s Center for Data Science. The center, founded last year, studies methods for analyzing vast amounts of information about complex systems. Insights from data science can be applied to almost any area of knowledge, from retailing to medicine to national security.

    Another $3 million will go to the university’sCybersecurity Institute, which will launch a new security training center in Springfield, where MassMutual is located. The center will offer a certification program in cybersecurity, where students can boost their network security skills without having to complete a four-year degree program.

    “We’re going to be using that money to jumpstart faculty hiring,” said UMass Amherst chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy, who said the faculty roster at the two facilities would be boosted to 40 members from its current 20. Subbaswamy said the university has already received the first tranche of funding and “we’re hiring faculty even as we speak.”

    Andrew McCallum, director of the Center for Data Science, said MassMutual may have been swayed to provide the money by its success in hiring UMass data scientists. “MassMutual hired some of our Ph.D students,” said McCallum, “and they were seeing tremendously positive results.”

    Nick Fyntrilakis, president of the MassMutual Foundation, said UMass Amherst is already a nationally recognized leader in data science and cybersecurity. “This gift really helps take us to the next level,” he said. In addition, Fyntrilakis said the grant would benefit the entire Pioneer Valley economy, by providing an ample supply of trained data scientists.

    UMass gets $15m for cybersecurity program - The Boston Globe

  • American Bureau of Shipping Information Commons - photo of building

    Massachusetts Maritime Academy First in Commonwealth System to Achieve LEED® Platinum Certification

    Mass Maritime's American Bureau of Shipping Information Commons is the first of the state's public college and university buildings to be awarded Platinum, the highest level of LEED certification

    This is the first LEED Platinum building in the commonwealth’s college and university system. The ABS Information Commons is home to the Academy’s Academic Resource Center, 360º bridge simulator, library and archives collection, and classroom and meeting space. The project achieved LEED certification for implementing practical and measurable solutions in the following:

    Energy efficiency – heating and cooling generated by a 48-well, closed loop, geothermal heat pump, electricity provided through 103kW, rooftop, solar photovoltaic array and procurement of wind energy renewable energy credits, use of daylighting, motion sensors and LED lamps, and chilled beam HVAC system. The building is designed to run at least 35% more efficient than standard construction.

    Innovation and design – the building utilizes a sloped roof specifically designed for solar photovoltaics.nThe sloped roof also allows for maximum wind flow over the building that improves performance of thenAcademy’s wind turbine. A rotund column inside the building effectively provides space for the Academy’s bridge simulator that trains cadets on the operation and handling of vessels, while other spaces in the column are used for academic resources. Water conservation – restrooms are equipped with low flow fixtures. The sloped roof allows for flow of rainwater to a bio-swale that provides habitat for flora and fauna; no irrigation is provided.

    Construction materials selection – framework constructed of 100% recycled steel, concrete comprised of 20% recycled content, insulation made from 40% recycled materials, and use of rapidly renewable wood.

    Sustainable site selection – the building was placed on a former parking area and did not replace existing or open green space. The building is elevated above flood levels as measure of resiliency.

    Vice President of Operations, Paul O’Keefe, stated, “The Academy takes pride in being the first Massachusetts state college/university to achieve LEED Platinum. This accomplishment is one of many the Academy has taken to be a leader in sustainability and environmental stewardship. We are looking forward to continuing this process and providing a learn-do- learn environment for our cadets.”

    The ABS Information Commons is the third LEED certified building on campus and joins the LEED Gold 1st and 2nd Company Dormitory Expansion completed in 2008 and the LEED Silver 4th Company Expansion completed in 2014.

    The LEED rating system, developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), is the foremost program for buildings, homes and communities that are designed, constructed, maintained and operated for improved environmental and human health performance.

    Leading LEEDS - Mass Maritime News

Building Student Interest in STEM

  • Shutterstock photo from Boston Globe

    Training the Next Generation in Science and Technology

    Read the Op-Ed by Karyn Polito, Joe Kennedy III and Jeffrey Leiden in the Boston Globe about the importance of exploring STEM careers in high school

    When Glady Baez came to her Vertex Pharmaceuticals internship as a high school junior, she was uncertain of her future. While she was interested in science and business, she didn’t know the range of career options possible.

    During Glady’s paid internship at Vertex, she and her class of 30 high school interns worked alongside scientists steeped in research on cystic fibrosis and other diseases. The experience sparked her imagination in science and propelled her down a track that, three years later, has her feet firmly planted as a biology major at UMass Boston. She is the first in her family to go to college.

    Glady’s internship at one of the nation’s most dynamic biotech companies opened doors too often closed to high school students, especially females and students of color. The dearth of similar opportunities not only prevents promising young people from excelling in deeply rewarding careers, it stymies our economic growth.

    Keeping Massachusetts competitive requires a workforce that excels in science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM. More than 40 percent of the Commonwealth’s economy centers on jobs in STEM fields, including advanced manufacturing, information technology, and biotech.

    Massachusetts has more open positions in these fields than employees to fill them, a void that threatens our economic drivers. Industry analysts and CEOs repeatedly identify this gap as the single greatest challenge facing the Commonwealth’s STEM economy.

    Massachusetts isn’t alone. Across the country, states with strong technology, biotech, medical, and engineering economies struggle to provide employers with educated, work-ready employees. And STEM readiness has global implications: There is an international race to create a highly skilled workforce capable of driving an increasingly innovation-centered world.

    That is why it’s so important that students like Glady have opportunities to learn about STEM careers. And that is why we’re making a simple but powerful ask of Massachusetts businesses: Hire at least one high school student for a STEM internship.

    Continues on BostonGlobe.com >

  • Students Participate in BU Inspiration Ambassadors program in partnership with AT&T

    New Report Highlights Business-Education Partnerships

    A new report released by the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, “Shaping the Future Workforce,” showcases partnerships businesses have created with public schools, community colleges and universities.

    The report features best practices and key drivers of success to engage and inspire the next generation of workers in three categories: 1) Engaging & Inspiring the Future Workforce; 2) Targeted Curriculum & Training Partnerships to produce workers with the skills they need most; and 3) Advancement Opportunities for Current Workers.

    Business leaders consistently cite five common drivers of success that apply to partnerships yielding the best outcomes. These themes offer a foundation for policy makers and educators to develop and scale future initiatives:

    • Adaptability. Adapting the goals of the program over time enables both businesses and educational institutions to evolve to meet changing needs, thus increasing the likelihood of the success;
    • Responsiveness. Acknowledging and being responsive to the different needs of students is necessary to ensure the maximum number of students are able to complete the program;
    • Accountability. Empirically measuring outcomes of these partnerships (i.e. completion rates, costs, attendance) allows for concrete analysis on the program’s impact;
    • Affordability. Emphasizing low cost is incredibly important to maximize the number of students able to participate thus increasing the impact of the program; and,
    • Leadership. Commitment by senior-level leadership is imperative and leads to a mutually beneficial partnership

    Photo: Students Participate in BU Inspiration Ambassadors program in partnership with AT&T. Credit Cydney Scott

  • 2016 STEM Summit logo

    2016 STEM Summit focuses on "Building a Lifetime
    of Opportunity"

    Nurturing a curiosity and enthusiasm for STEM can begin in the earliest years of life and be built upon over the course of a lifetime. Opportunities abound in formal and informal education settings at all ages and levels.

    2016 Massachusetts STEM Summit

    Tuesday, November 1, 2016
    7:30 a.m. - 3:45 p.m.
    DCU Center, Worcester, MA

    In addition to a full slate of diverse and exciting breakout sessions and exhibits offered throughout the day, we are proud to announce an engaging roster of plenary speakers including:

    In the Morning Opening: Kelli Wells, Executive Director for Education at the GE Foundation, will share some exciting STEM plans GE has as it relocates its world headquarters to Boston, and Youth CITIES Founder and Executive Director Vicky Wu Davis, along with several students, will describe how this innovative program helps youth develop entrepreneurial skills and mindsets.

    At the Luncheon Plenary: This year's "The Hall at Patriot Place" 2016 Massachusetts STEM Teacher of the Year will be introduced and then we'll hear all about the groundbreaking, Massachusetts-based, iRobot® Corporation from its co-founder and CEO, Colin Angle.

    Recent years' Summits have sold out, so please register soon!

  • SSA Student shows Lieutenant Gov. Polito a project she's working on.

    Governor Baker and State Officials Visit Bunker Hill Community College STEM Starter Academy

    Governor Baker, Lieutenant Governor Polito, House Speaker DeLeo, Education Secretary Peyser and Higher Education Commissioner Santiago observed and engaged with two classrooms during their visit.

    Top state officials got a chance to visit the first day of the STEM Starter Academy at Bunker Hill Community College on Monday, August 22, 2016.

    Many enrolled in the STEM Starter Academy are Chelsea High School students from BHCC’s TRiO Chelsea program, which helps students complete college coursework while still in high school. With thirty-five percent of TRiO graduates intending to pursue careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields, the STEM Starter Academy is a great way to help jump-start students’ major-specific courses, allowing them to complete their degree programs on time or even early.


    Photo courtesy Bunker Hill Community College.

  • Three students gather around a microscope in a lab. Photo courtesy Bridgewater State University.

    Baker-Polito Administration Awards $260,000 to Promote STEM Education

    Grant awards will support the Commonwealth’s Regional STEM Networks.

    The Baker-Polito Administration today announced over $250,000 in grant awards to support the Commonwealth’s Regional STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Networks.

    Begun in 2004, the state’s Regional STEM Networks, often hosted by institutions of higher education, serve as hubs for connecting educators, community leaders and industry partners to further excite and energize students about opportunities in STEM subjects. These networks are among the longest standing STEM Networks in the country.

    “I thank all of our STEM Network partners who are working to help meet the future needs of our rapidly changing economy and bolster skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “Our collective efforts continue to increase engagement in and raise awareness about the importance of STEM education both for our economy and the new opportunities it creates for our young people.” 

    “Capturing students’ interest in learning about and working in STEM careers is critical for our economy,” said Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, a co-chair of the STEM Advisory Council. “These Regional STEM Networks serve as the local centers for building excitement and energy for students about potential futures in STEM careers.”

    “We must connect local industry and community organizations with schools to ensure that students are able to see the exciting opportunities in STEM fields in their region,” said Secretary of Education Jim Peyser. “The Regional STEM Networks play an invaluable role in promoting and expanding STEM opportunities for students in collaboration with employer partners and local colleges and universities.”

    The fiscal year (FY) 2017 grant for the Regional STEM Networks included incentives for collaboration across regions as well as for aligning focus areas with STEM Advisory Council priorities.

    Those priorities include:

    • Expanding work-based learning opportunities for high school students, particularly in STEM fields;
    • Developing and implementing models of STEM Early College Career Pathways; and
    • Broadening access to computer science and engineering courses.

    The fiscal year (FY) 2017 funding from the Commonwealth’s STEM Pipeline Fund will support Regional STEM Networks across the state, including:

    • Berkshire County & Pioneer Valley: MA College of Liberal Arts will serve as the host of the Regional STEM Network, and will collaborate with education, community and industry partners across the Berkshire County and the Pioneer Valley, including Holyoke Community College.
    • Boston & Metro North: The Boston Private Industry Council (PIC) will join with the Metro North Regional Employment Board as the lead institutions to coordinate and promote STEM activities among education, community, and industry leaders in Boston and in the communities in Metro North, including Revere, Everett, Chelsea, and Lynn.
    • Central Massachusetts & Metrowest: Worcester Polytechnic Institute will serve as the lead institution to promote STEM education in Central Massachusetts while also collaborating with Framingham State University, community partners and employers in Metrowest to expand the reach of that Regional Network.
    • Southeast Massachusetts & Cape Cod: Bridgewater State University and Cape Cod Community College will collaborate to build a coordinated Regional STEM Network.

    Photo courtesy Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts.

Go Higher! Discover Your Community Colleges, State Universities & UMass Campuses

  • Go Higher Logo

    What is Go Higher?

    Go Higher! promotes college readiness and raises awareness of the growing number of outstanding programs and opportunities available to students at our community colleges, state universities and UMass campuses.

    Go Higher! is a campaign by the Department of Higher Education, in partnership with Massachusetts' 29 public colleges and universities, to raise awareness of the growing number of outstanding programs and opportunities available to students at our community colleges, state universities and UMass campuses.

  • Photo of Boyden Hall at Bridgewater State University

    Bridgewater State University special education program ranks nationally

    The special education program at Bridgewater State University recently earned a top 10 national ranking from Teacher.org

    In its annual Best Colleges in Education Special Education rankings, Teacher.org used graduation rates, size of program, default rates and affordability among its criteria as it analyzed more than 400 colleges and universities across the nation that offer special education degrees.

    Through its College of Education and Allied Studies, Bridgewater State University offers special education degrees at both the bachelor’s and master’s degree levels and, in the Teacher.org ranking, rated number six in the nation.

    “We are thrilled to learn of this prestigious ranking,” said Lisa Battaglino, dean of the College of Education and Allied Studies. “Bridgewater is one of America’s oldest teacher education institutions, and with this strong foundation, we continue as leader in educator preparation.”

    With a graduation rate of 62.16 percent, a percent of program graduates out of all graduates per year score of 31.46 and a tuition affordability score of 40.07, Bridgewater became only one of 20 institutions named to the special education list. Teachers.org also rated top programs in early childhood education, educational leadership, elementary education and master’s in education using Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System survey files.

    “Undergraduates at Bridgewater are encouraged to be passionate about their chosen vocation of special education teachers, as the field is still in need of dedicated individuals ready to teach special populations in a contemporary classroom environment,” according to the listing on Teacher.org.

    The Department of Special Education offers a Bachelor of Science in Education in special education, a five-year dual licensure program — Bachelor of Science in elementary education, Master of Education in special education, a minor in special education and Master of Education in special education.

    Graduates of the program pursue careers as special education teachers in public and private schools, counselors, consultants and school administrators.

    Bridgewater State University special education program ranks nationally - Wicked Local Bridgewater

  • Massasoit Campus from above

    Grant gives Massasoit region's first vet tech school

    Massasoit's Canton campus received $442,000 from the state to construct a facility for the first vet tech program in Southeastern Massachusetts

    This region is one of the most lucrative places in the country to be a veterinary technician, but it’s also an area with no vet tech school. Massasoit Community College will change that this year, thanks in part to a $442,000 grant from the state.

    On Monday at the State House, Sen. Marc Pacheco (D - Taunton) announced a $442,517 Skills Capital Grant to outfit a vet tech clinical instructional facility on the Massasoit Community College Canton campus. The facility broke ground on construction in June.

    Citing the “utmost importance” of workforce training for Southeastern Massachusetts and the state as a whole, Pacheco said the vet tech program will help students interested in STEM and Animal Science get the practical education they need to succeed in these fields.

    “We must ensure that individuals can develop and improve skills to meet the needs of our Commonwealth’s economy,” Pacheco said. “The success and vibrancy of our communities depend on it.”

    The new vet tech program, which last fall began enrolling its first students, targets high school seniors or recent high school graduates, including students currently enrolled at Norfolk County Agricultural High School with whom the program has a dual enrollment articulation.

    The program is also open to current vet techs who may be displaced without licensure, and un-employed or under-employed adults looking to make a living wage in the animal health care industry.

    According to May 2015 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, vet techs in the Brockton-Bridgewater-Easton area are some of the highest-paid in the country, with an annual median wage of $46,670 compared to the national annual median wage of $33,280.

    “The rapidly expanding animal health care industry has created a distinct need for Veterinary Technicians,” Massasoit President Charles Wall said Monday. “The career opportunities available to graduates of this program are varied and in-demand, and we are excited to provide training that helps address a regional need.”

    There are currently five vet tech schools in Massachusetts, but none in the Southeastern part of the state.

    Mount Ida College, in Newton, houses the closest vet tech program.

    The instructional facility on the Massasoit Canton campus will include a surgical suite and a digital radiology room, and it will house dogs and cats for students to gain hands-on training of surgical prep, imaging, examinations, and animal care.

    The facility will cost $1.4 million in total, according to a Monday press release from Pacheco’s office.

    The grant will help outfit the space with state-of-the-art equipment, and will allow the school to provide additional training opportunities, a spokesperson from Massasoit said.

    The facility will be managed by a certified veterinary technician, who will work closely with our assistant professor of veterinary medicine, who is a licensed veterinarian. Students in the program and part time animal care attendants will help provide coverage at the facility as well.

    Grant gives Massasoit region's first vet tech school - The Enterprise

  • Students work together at a laptop

    UMass Amherst gets $15 million for cybersecurity program

    University of Massachusetts Amherst’s computer science programs are about to enjoy a growth spurt, thanks to a $15 million grant from a foundation established by the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co.

    University of Massachusetts Amherst’s computer science programs are about to enjoy a growth spurt, thanks to a $15 million grant from a foundation established by the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co., better known as MassMutual.

    The MassMutual Foundation will donate the money over 10 years, with $12 million going to the university’s Center for Data Science. The center, founded last year, studies methods for analyzing vast amounts of information about complex systems. Insights from data science can be applied to almost any area of knowledge, from retailing to medicine to national security.

    Another $3 million will go to the university’sCybersecurity Institute, which will launch a new security training center in Springfield, where MassMutual is located. The center will offer a certification program in cybersecurity, where students can boost their network security skills without having to complete a four-year degree program.

    “We’re going to be using that money to jumpstart faculty hiring,” said UMass Amherst chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy, who said the faculty roster at the two facilities would be boosted to 40 members from its current 20. Subbaswamy said the university has already received the first tranche of funding and “we’re hiring faculty even as we speak.”

    Andrew McCallum, director of the Center for Data Science, said MassMutual may have been swayed to provide the money by its success in hiring UMass data scientists. “MassMutual hired some of our Ph.D students,” said McCallum, “and they were seeing tremendously positive results.”

    Nick Fyntrilakis, president of the MassMutual Foundation, said UMass Amherst is already a nationally recognized leader in data science and cybersecurity. “This gift really helps take us to the next level,” he said. In addition, Fyntrilakis said the grant would benefit the entire Pioneer Valley economy, by providing an ample supply of trained data scientists.

    UMass gets $15m for cybersecurity program - The Boston Globe

  • American Bureau of Shipping Information Commons - photo of building

    Massachusetts Maritime Academy First in Commonwealth System to Achieve LEED® Platinum Certification

    Mass Maritime's American Bureau of Shipping Information Commons is the first of the state's public college and university buildings to be awarded Platinum, the highest level of LEED certification

    This is the first LEED Platinum building in the commonwealth’s college and university system. The ABS Information Commons is home to the Academy’s Academic Resource Center, 360º bridge simulator, library and archives collection, and classroom and meeting space. The project achieved LEED certification for implementing practical and measurable solutions in the following:

    Energy efficiency – heating and cooling generated by a 48-well, closed loop, geothermal heat pump, electricity provided through 103kW, rooftop, solar photovoltaic array and procurement of wind energy renewable energy credits, use of daylighting, motion sensors and LED lamps, and chilled beam HVAC system. The building is designed to run at least 35% more efficient than standard construction.

    Innovation and design – the building utilizes a sloped roof specifically designed for solar photovoltaics.nThe sloped roof also allows for maximum wind flow over the building that improves performance of thenAcademy’s wind turbine. A rotund column inside the building effectively provides space for the Academy’s bridge simulator that trains cadets on the operation and handling of vessels, while other spaces in the column are used for academic resources. Water conservation – restrooms are equipped with low flow fixtures. The sloped roof allows for flow of rainwater to a bio-swale that provides habitat for flora and fauna; no irrigation is provided.

    Construction materials selection – framework constructed of 100% recycled steel, concrete comprised of 20% recycled content, insulation made from 40% recycled materials, and use of rapidly renewable wood.

    Sustainable site selection – the building was placed on a former parking area and did not replace existing or open green space. The building is elevated above flood levels as measure of resiliency.

    Vice President of Operations, Paul O’Keefe, stated, “The Academy takes pride in being the first Massachusetts state college/university to achieve LEED Platinum. This accomplishment is one of many the Academy has taken to be a leader in sustainability and environmental stewardship. We are looking forward to continuing this process and providing a learn-do- learn environment for our cadets.”

    The ABS Information Commons is the third LEED certified building on campus and joins the LEED Gold 1st and 2nd Company Dormitory Expansion completed in 2008 and the LEED Silver 4th Company Expansion completed in 2014.

    The LEED rating system, developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), is the foremost program for buildings, homes and communities that are designed, constructed, maintained and operated for improved environmental and human health performance.

    Leading LEEDS - Mass Maritime News

Building Student Interest in STEM

  • Shutterstock photo from Boston Globe

    Training the Next Generation in Science and Technology

    Read the Op-Ed by Karyn Polito, Joe Kennedy III and Jeffrey Leiden in the Boston Globe about the importance of exploring STEM careers in high school

    When Glady Baez came to her Vertex Pharmaceuticals internship as a high school junior, she was uncertain of her future. While she was interested in science and business, she didn’t know the range of career options possible.

    During Glady’s paid internship at Vertex, she and her class of 30 high school interns worked alongside scientists steeped in research on cystic fibrosis and other diseases. The experience sparked her imagination in science and propelled her down a track that, three years later, has her feet firmly planted as a biology major at UMass Boston. She is the first in her family to go to college.

    Glady’s internship at one of the nation’s most dynamic biotech companies opened doors too often closed to high school students, especially females and students of color. The dearth of similar opportunities not only prevents promising young people from excelling in deeply rewarding careers, it stymies our economic growth.

    Keeping Massachusetts competitive requires a workforce that excels in science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM. More than 40 percent of the Commonwealth’s economy centers on jobs in STEM fields, including advanced manufacturing, information technology, and biotech.

    Massachusetts has more open positions in these fields than employees to fill them, a void that threatens our economic drivers. Industry analysts and CEOs repeatedly identify this gap as the single greatest challenge facing the Commonwealth’s STEM economy.

    Massachusetts isn’t alone. Across the country, states with strong technology, biotech, medical, and engineering economies struggle to provide employers with educated, work-ready employees. And STEM readiness has global implications: There is an international race to create a highly skilled workforce capable of driving an increasingly innovation-centered world.

    That is why it’s so important that students like Glady have opportunities to learn about STEM careers. And that is why we’re making a simple but powerful ask of Massachusetts businesses: Hire at least one high school student for a STEM internship.

    Continues on BostonGlobe.com >

  • Students Participate in BU Inspiration Ambassadors program in partnership with AT&T

    New Report Highlights Business-Education Partnerships

    A new report released by the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, “Shaping the Future Workforce,” showcases partnerships businesses have created with public schools, community colleges and universities.

    The report features best practices and key drivers of success to engage and inspire the next generation of workers in three categories: 1) Engaging & Inspiring the Future Workforce; 2) Targeted Curriculum & Training Partnerships to produce workers with the skills they need most; and 3) Advancement Opportunities for Current Workers.

    Business leaders consistently cite five common drivers of success that apply to partnerships yielding the best outcomes. These themes offer a foundation for policy makers and educators to develop and scale future initiatives:

    • Adaptability. Adapting the goals of the program over time enables both businesses and educational institutions to evolve to meet changing needs, thus increasing the likelihood of the success;
    • Responsiveness. Acknowledging and being responsive to the different needs of students is necessary to ensure the maximum number of students are able to complete the program;
    • Accountability. Empirically measuring outcomes of these partnerships (i.e. completion rates, costs, attendance) allows for concrete analysis on the program’s impact;
    • Affordability. Emphasizing low cost is incredibly important to maximize the number of students able to participate thus increasing the impact of the program; and,
    • Leadership. Commitment by senior-level leadership is imperative and leads to a mutually beneficial partnership

    Photo: Students Participate in BU Inspiration Ambassadors program in partnership with AT&T. Credit Cydney Scott

  • 2016 STEM Summit logo

    2016 STEM Summit focuses on "Building a Lifetime
    of Opportunity"

    Nurturing a curiosity and enthusiasm for STEM can begin in the earliest years of life and be built upon over the course of a lifetime. Opportunities abound in formal and informal education settings at all ages and levels.

    2016 Massachusetts STEM Summit

    Tuesday, November 1, 2016
    7:30 a.m. - 3:45 p.m.
    DCU Center, Worcester, MA

    In addition to a full slate of diverse and exciting breakout sessions and exhibits offered throughout the day, we are proud to announce an engaging roster of plenary speakers including:

    In the Morning Opening: Kelli Wells, Executive Director for Education at the GE Foundation, will share some exciting STEM plans GE has as it relocates its world headquarters to Boston, and Youth CITIES Founder and Executive Director Vicky Wu Davis, along with several students, will describe how this innovative program helps youth develop entrepreneurial skills and mindsets.

    At the Luncheon Plenary: This year's "The Hall at Patriot Place" 2016 Massachusetts STEM Teacher of the Year will be introduced and then we'll hear all about the groundbreaking, Massachusetts-based, iRobot® Corporation from its co-founder and CEO, Colin Angle.

    Recent years' Summits have sold out, so please register soon!

  • SSA Student shows Lieutenant Gov. Polito a project she's working on.

    Governor Baker and State Officials Visit Bunker Hill Community College STEM Starter Academy

    Governor Baker, Lieutenant Governor Polito, House Speaker DeLeo, Education Secretary Peyser and Higher Education Commissioner Santiago observed and engaged with two classrooms during their visit.

    Top state officials got a chance to visit the first day of the STEM Starter Academy at Bunker Hill Community College on Monday, August 22, 2016.

    Many enrolled in the STEM Starter Academy are Chelsea High School students from BHCC’s TRiO Chelsea program, which helps students complete college coursework while still in high school. With thirty-five percent of TRiO graduates intending to pursue careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields, the STEM Starter Academy is a great way to help jump-start students’ major-specific courses, allowing them to complete their degree programs on time or even early.


    Photo courtesy Bunker Hill Community College.

  • Three students gather around a microscope in a lab. Photo courtesy Bridgewater State University.

    Baker-Polito Administration Awards $260,000 to Promote STEM Education

    Grant awards will support the Commonwealth’s Regional STEM Networks.

    The Baker-Polito Administration today announced over $250,000 in grant awards to support the Commonwealth’s Regional STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Networks.

    Begun in 2004, the state’s Regional STEM Networks, often hosted by institutions of higher education, serve as hubs for connecting educators, community leaders and industry partners to further excite and energize students about opportunities in STEM subjects. These networks are among the longest standing STEM Networks in the country.

    “I thank all of our STEM Network partners who are working to help meet the future needs of our rapidly changing economy and bolster skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “Our collective efforts continue to increase engagement in and raise awareness about the importance of STEM education both for our economy and the new opportunities it creates for our young people.” 

    “Capturing students’ interest in learning about and working in STEM careers is critical for our economy,” said Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, a co-chair of the STEM Advisory Council. “These Regional STEM Networks serve as the local centers for building excitement and energy for students about potential futures in STEM careers.”

    “We must connect local industry and community organizations with schools to ensure that students are able to see the exciting opportunities in STEM fields in their region,” said Secretary of Education Jim Peyser. “The Regional STEM Networks play an invaluable role in promoting and expanding STEM opportunities for students in collaboration with employer partners and local colleges and universities.”

    The fiscal year (FY) 2017 grant for the Regional STEM Networks included incentives for collaboration across regions as well as for aligning focus areas with STEM Advisory Council priorities.

    Those priorities include:

    • Expanding work-based learning opportunities for high school students, particularly in STEM fields;
    • Developing and implementing models of STEM Early College Career Pathways; and
    • Broadening access to computer science and engineering courses.

    The fiscal year (FY) 2017 funding from the Commonwealth’s STEM Pipeline Fund will support Regional STEM Networks across the state, including:

    • Berkshire County & Pioneer Valley: MA College of Liberal Arts will serve as the host of the Regional STEM Network, and will collaborate with education, community and industry partners across the Berkshire County and the Pioneer Valley, including Holyoke Community College.
    • Boston & Metro North: The Boston Private Industry Council (PIC) will join with the Metro North Regional Employment Board as the lead institutions to coordinate and promote STEM activities among education, community, and industry leaders in Boston and in the communities in Metro North, including Revere, Everett, Chelsea, and Lynn.
    • Central Massachusetts & Metrowest: Worcester Polytechnic Institute will serve as the lead institution to promote STEM education in Central Massachusetts while also collaborating with Framingham State University, community partners and employers in Metrowest to expand the reach of that Regional Network.
    • Southeast Massachusetts & Cape Cod: Bridgewater State University and Cape Cod Community College will collaborate to build a coordinated Regional STEM Network.

    Photo courtesy Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts.