Go Higher! Discover Your Community Colleges, State Universities & UMass Campuses

  • Go Higher Logo

    What is Go Higher?

    Go Higher! promotes college readiness and raises awareness of the growing number of outstanding programs and opportunities available to students at our community colleges, state universities and UMass campuses.

    Go Higher! is a campaign by the Department of Higher Education, in partnership with Massachusetts' 29 public colleges and universities, to raise awareness of the growing number of outstanding programs and opportunities available to students at our community colleges, state universities and UMass campuses.

  • STCC Campus

    STCC offers 'fast track' customer service training program

    A customer service certificate training program that will help students with everything from developing interview skills to job hunting

    A customer service certificate training program that will help students with everything from developing interview skills to job hunting will be offered at Springfield Technical Community College this spring.

    The college is once offering a "Fast Track" option of the new certificate program in Customer Service Essentials. In 16 weeks students will earn 24 college credits that can transfer into an associate degree in business administration.

    "STCC's Fast Track Customer Service Essentials Certificate option provides an educational career pathway to employment in advanced customer service representative roles that are in high demand by local employers," said STCC Vice President of Foundation and Workforce Training Robert LePage in a written statement. "Students will work together in a structured group to support learning and team work."

    According to the school customer service representatives are in demand in a variety of fields including financial services, call centers, manufacturing services, retail organizations, inside sales, and small business services.

    The program will place emphasis on essential workforce readiness skills to support graduates as they transition to employment. There will also be guest speakers, company tours and speed networking (interview) sessions. Job placement assistance will be provided, school officials said.

    "STCC offers 'fast track' customer service training program" - masslive.com

    Photo courtesy Springfield Technical Community College

  • Students walk on UMass Dartmouth campus

    UMass Dartmouth earns national research university status

    UMD received the designation from the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education

    Earning a status it has long coveted, UMass Dartmouth is now officially a doctoral research university.

    The designation is an “an extremely impressive achievement for the university's faculty and students,” said UMass President Marty Meehan in a news release Monday afternoon.

    It’s “an important mile marker” that demonstrates the excellence of the faculty and the university’s dedication to driving innovation, said Provost Mohammad Karim. “It makes us more attractive and the national reputation gets us beyond state boundaries,” he said Monday night.

    The Dartmouth school is the last of UMass’ five campuses to receive the national status despite long being a local leader in research and innovation, officials said.

    “From marine science that supports our historic fishing industry and protects our fragile coastline to the study of our economy and global cultures, UMass Dartmouth faculty members are creating and sharing new knowledge that strengthens society and adds tremendous value to the education students receive,” Meehan said in a statement.

    UMass Dartmouth’s research enterprise has grown from $21.2 million to $28.2 million since 2005, with most of the sponsored research in the marine science and engineering fields, officials said. It offers 12 doctoral programs and annual PhD’s awarded have grown from three to 26 since 2010. University researchers have also emerged as national and statewide experts on the economy, social networking, global terrorism, community health, the Portuguese-American experience, the law, and marine research, they said.

    UMass Dartmouth earns national research university status" - Taunton Gazette

  • Middlesex Community College's Lowell Campus

    Middlesex Community College's Online Criminal Justice Program Ranks 14th in Nation

    Students complete the same high-quality coursework as those who take courses on campus and earn the same course credits – which are transferrable to bachelor’s degree programs.

    “The online Criminal Justice Program at Middlesex offers flexibility to students who are looking to complete a degree online or complete a degree with a combination of in-class and online courses,” said Lynda J. Pintrich, chair of MCC’s Criminal Justice program. “It is a rigorous program, taught predominantly by full-time criminal justice faculty, who take a great deal of pride in their work, both online and in the classroom.”

    With a focus on emerging trends and developments in online education, OnlineColleges.net has been informing prospective students on leading programs since 2009. MCC’s online Criminal Justice – Administration of Justice option degree program is designed for students interested in working in areas such as probation, parole, corrections, victim/witness advocacy and related occupations. Students are able to develop a strong foundation in criminal justice and also study topics such as victimology, juvenile justice and corrections.

    "Middlesex Online Criminal Justice Program Ranks 14th in Nation" - Lowell.com

    Photo Courtesy Middlesex Community College

  • Student working with animation software on a computer / Photo Courtesy NECC

    Want to study game design? Try Fitchburg State

    Fitchburg State University two years ago became the first public institution in New England to offer a bachelor’s degree in game design.

    Amanda LeBlanc knew she wanted to study game design in college, so when it came time to make a decision about where to go, Fitchburg State University stood out.

    Two years ago, Fitchburg State became the first public institution in New England to offer a bachelor’s degree in game design as part of its communications media department. Today it is one of the fastest-growing programs at the college.

    “What I liked most about Fitchburg is that they connected to me on a personal level,’’ said the 20-year-old freshman from Lynn. “I met all the professors, and they were guiding me toward what I needed to do. We’re a close-knit community, and I love that. Everyone helps everyone.’’

    A projected decline in the high school population is forcing Massachusetts’ public colleges to work even harder to attract students and help educate the state’s future work force. Schools are trying to stand out by offering unique programs, new facilities — or, perhaps, a beautiful campus away from the hustle and bustle of Eastern Massachusetts.

    A recent report from the state Board of Higher Education shows that overall undergraduate enrollment is down by 1.8 percent at the state’s public colleges and universities since the fall of 2014. Enrollment dipped at the community colleges and state universities but continued to rise in the UMass system.

    Massachusetts is one of 15 states located in the Northeast and upper Midwest whose populations of high school students are projected to shrink by more than 5 percent within the next eight years, according to the report.

    “Finding some niche programs is important, but it’s not just about the programs — the campus has to be different,’’ said Sean Ganas, director of admissions at Fitchburg State. “We have renovated our entire campus, so it really has the feel of a private liberal arts college at a public university price. That is how we are differentiating ourselves from other campuses.’’

    "Want to study game design? Try Fitchburg State" - The Boston Globe

    Photo courtesy Fitchburg State University

Building Student Interest in STEM

  • MWCC’s STEM Starter Summer Academy Gives Students Jump Start on College

    Mass. Department of Higher Education grant allows students to receive up to two free college courses, textbooks, a substantial stipend, academic support and tutoring.

    GARDNER - Along with typical summertime activities, Adam Leyenaar of Ayer spent the better part of the season getting a jump start on his college degree.

    A 2015 graduate of the Parker Charter School, Leyenaar was one of 16 area students participating in Mount Wachusett Community College’s eight-week STEM Starter Summer Academy. Students received up to two free college courses, textbooks, a substantial stipend, academic support and tutoring.

    “I want to be an immunologist, so I need a good background,” said Leyenaar, who plans to earn an associate degree in medical laboratory technology so he can work in the field while pursuing his bachelor’s and master’s degrees.
    Funded through a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education, the STEM Starter Sumer Academy is open to high school graduates or qualifying MWCC students who place into college-level English and math courses and are enrolling in one of MWCC’s STEM majors in the fall.

    Qualifying MWCC STEM majors include allied health, biology, biotechnology, chemistry, computer information systems, fitness leadership and exercise science, medical laboratory technology, natural resources, physics and pre-engineering.

    Courses offered during the summer academy included intermediate algebra, introduction to functions and modeling, life science for allied health, anatomy and physiology I, general chemistry II and introduction to psychology. In addition to the coursework, students helped run experiments at Rapoport Lab at Harvard Medical School, visited AbbVie medical labs in Worcester, and toured the construction site of MWCC’s new STEM building, which will open in 2016. The students also participated in MWCC’s Summer Leadership Academy.

    “Our students have had an outstanding summer and are ready to continue their studies this fall with two courses already under their belt,” said Christine Davis, MWCC’s STEM Starter Academy recruiter. Students from more than 10 area towns enrolled in the rigorous program, and tackled classes in an accelerated format that will prepare them for their careers, she said.

    Many of the academy students are also recipients of STEM SET scholarships. These awards of up to $3,500 per year are available to qualifying STEM majors through a grant the college received from the National Science Foundation.
    Gardner resident Ifra Hassan, enrolled in MWCC’s liberal arts biological studies program with the goal of continuing her studies in medicine and become a doctor. Hassan said she chose the college for its supportive environment.

    “I wanted to start my career where I will receive teachers’ support.”

    Next year, up to 30 students will be accepted into the Stem Starter Summer Academy. For more information, contact MWCC’s admission’s office at 978-630-9110 or admissions@mwcc.mass.edu.

  • 12th Annual Massachusetts STEM Summit is Tuesday, November 10

    Themed "Promising Practices, Proven Results", the day will include panel presentations, plenary speakers, and exhibitors showcasing STEM initiatives

    Mark your calendars for the 12th annual Massachusetts STEM Summit! Join us on Tuesday, November 10, 2015 at the DCU Center in Worcester!

    Themed "Promising Practices, Proven Results", the day will include panel presentations, plenary speakers, and exhibitors showcasing STEM initiatives; sharing innovative thinking; and highlighting the goals, plans, and progress of STEM policies and programs.

    Sessions will cover a broad range of topics including: early childhood, K-12, and higher education; out-of-school time programs; digital education; research and practice; innovation and entrepreneurship; workforce development and career awareness; state policy and business needs; and more.

    To see session descriptions, visit the Summit schedule.

    Registration opens at 9:00am on Wednesday, September 16. Please visit www.mass-stem-summit.org to register. The registration fee will be $50. Please note: this fee will be waived for all full-time students. Space is limited so please register early!

    The Massachusetts STEM Summit is hosted by:

    Massachusetts STEM Advisory Council
    Massachusetts Business Roundtable
    University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute

  • Photo Courtesy Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

    413 STEM Ready Academy

    MCLA program aims to inspire community college students

    NORTH ADAMS — Adrienne Wootters says when she meets community college students who transfer into her department at MCLA, they seem to know where they're going with their studies.

    "They're always really well-prepared and interested," said Wootters, a physics professor at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts.

    For the second consecutive summer, the college is hosting an immersion program in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to enrich the STEM experiences of students from three of the region's community colleges.

    The week-long 413 STEM Ready Academy, which concluded on Friday, included 25 students: nine from Berkshire Community College, and eight each from Holyoke and Greenfield community colleges.

    The program is offered at no cost; it is funded through a $239,334 grant awarded in 2013 to MCLA through the state Department of Higher Education's Performance Initiative Fund.

    "By immersing them in STEM coursework, our hope is that this will encourage them to go into a four-year program or beyond in exploring this field," said Mary Nash.

    >> Continues on BerkshireEagle.com

    Photo Courtesy Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

Go Higher! Discover Your Community Colleges, State Universities & UMass Campuses

  • Go Higher Logo

    What is Go Higher?

    Go Higher! promotes college readiness and raises awareness of the growing number of outstanding programs and opportunities available to students at our community colleges, state universities and UMass campuses.

    Go Higher! is a campaign by the Department of Higher Education, in partnership with Massachusetts' 29 public colleges and universities, to raise awareness of the growing number of outstanding programs and opportunities available to students at our community colleges, state universities and UMass campuses.

  • STCC Campus

    STCC offers 'fast track' customer service training program

    A customer service certificate training program that will help students with everything from developing interview skills to job hunting

    A customer service certificate training program that will help students with everything from developing interview skills to job hunting will be offered at Springfield Technical Community College this spring.

    The college is once offering a "Fast Track" option of the new certificate program in Customer Service Essentials. In 16 weeks students will earn 24 college credits that can transfer into an associate degree in business administration.

    "STCC's Fast Track Customer Service Essentials Certificate option provides an educational career pathway to employment in advanced customer service representative roles that are in high demand by local employers," said STCC Vice President of Foundation and Workforce Training Robert LePage in a written statement. "Students will work together in a structured group to support learning and team work."

    According to the school customer service representatives are in demand in a variety of fields including financial services, call centers, manufacturing services, retail organizations, inside sales, and small business services.

    The program will place emphasis on essential workforce readiness skills to support graduates as they transition to employment. There will also be guest speakers, company tours and speed networking (interview) sessions. Job placement assistance will be provided, school officials said.

    "STCC offers 'fast track' customer service training program" - masslive.com

    Photo courtesy Springfield Technical Community College

  • Students walk on UMass Dartmouth campus

    UMass Dartmouth earns national research university status

    UMD received the designation from the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education

    Earning a status it has long coveted, UMass Dartmouth is now officially a doctoral research university.

    The designation is an “an extremely impressive achievement for the university's faculty and students,” said UMass President Marty Meehan in a news release Monday afternoon.

    It’s “an important mile marker” that demonstrates the excellence of the faculty and the university’s dedication to driving innovation, said Provost Mohammad Karim. “It makes us more attractive and the national reputation gets us beyond state boundaries,” he said Monday night.

    The Dartmouth school is the last of UMass’ five campuses to receive the national status despite long being a local leader in research and innovation, officials said.

    “From marine science that supports our historic fishing industry and protects our fragile coastline to the study of our economy and global cultures, UMass Dartmouth faculty members are creating and sharing new knowledge that strengthens society and adds tremendous value to the education students receive,” Meehan said in a statement.

    UMass Dartmouth’s research enterprise has grown from $21.2 million to $28.2 million since 2005, with most of the sponsored research in the marine science and engineering fields, officials said. It offers 12 doctoral programs and annual PhD’s awarded have grown from three to 26 since 2010. University researchers have also emerged as national and statewide experts on the economy, social networking, global terrorism, community health, the Portuguese-American experience, the law, and marine research, they said.

    UMass Dartmouth earns national research university status" - Taunton Gazette

  • Middlesex Community College's Lowell Campus

    Middlesex Community College's Online Criminal Justice Program Ranks 14th in Nation

    Students complete the same high-quality coursework as those who take courses on campus and earn the same course credits – which are transferrable to bachelor’s degree programs.

    “The online Criminal Justice Program at Middlesex offers flexibility to students who are looking to complete a degree online or complete a degree with a combination of in-class and online courses,” said Lynda J. Pintrich, chair of MCC’s Criminal Justice program. “It is a rigorous program, taught predominantly by full-time criminal justice faculty, who take a great deal of pride in their work, both online and in the classroom.”

    With a focus on emerging trends and developments in online education, OnlineColleges.net has been informing prospective students on leading programs since 2009. MCC’s online Criminal Justice – Administration of Justice option degree program is designed for students interested in working in areas such as probation, parole, corrections, victim/witness advocacy and related occupations. Students are able to develop a strong foundation in criminal justice and also study topics such as victimology, juvenile justice and corrections.

    "Middlesex Online Criminal Justice Program Ranks 14th in Nation" - Lowell.com

    Photo Courtesy Middlesex Community College

  • Student working with animation software on a computer / Photo Courtesy NECC

    Want to study game design? Try Fitchburg State

    Fitchburg State University two years ago became the first public institution in New England to offer a bachelor’s degree in game design.

    Amanda LeBlanc knew she wanted to study game design in college, so when it came time to make a decision about where to go, Fitchburg State University stood out.

    Two years ago, Fitchburg State became the first public institution in New England to offer a bachelor’s degree in game design as part of its communications media department. Today it is one of the fastest-growing programs at the college.

    “What I liked most about Fitchburg is that they connected to me on a personal level,’’ said the 20-year-old freshman from Lynn. “I met all the professors, and they were guiding me toward what I needed to do. We’re a close-knit community, and I love that. Everyone helps everyone.’’

    A projected decline in the high school population is forcing Massachusetts’ public colleges to work even harder to attract students and help educate the state’s future work force. Schools are trying to stand out by offering unique programs, new facilities — or, perhaps, a beautiful campus away from the hustle and bustle of Eastern Massachusetts.

    A recent report from the state Board of Higher Education shows that overall undergraduate enrollment is down by 1.8 percent at the state’s public colleges and universities since the fall of 2014. Enrollment dipped at the community colleges and state universities but continued to rise in the UMass system.

    Massachusetts is one of 15 states located in the Northeast and upper Midwest whose populations of high school students are projected to shrink by more than 5 percent within the next eight years, according to the report.

    “Finding some niche programs is important, but it’s not just about the programs — the campus has to be different,’’ said Sean Ganas, director of admissions at Fitchburg State. “We have renovated our entire campus, so it really has the feel of a private liberal arts college at a public university price. That is how we are differentiating ourselves from other campuses.’’

    "Want to study game design? Try Fitchburg State" - The Boston Globe

    Photo courtesy Fitchburg State University

Building Student Interest in STEM

  • MWCC’s STEM Starter Summer Academy Gives Students Jump Start on College

    Mass. Department of Higher Education grant allows students to receive up to two free college courses, textbooks, a substantial stipend, academic support and tutoring.

    GARDNER - Along with typical summertime activities, Adam Leyenaar of Ayer spent the better part of the season getting a jump start on his college degree.

    A 2015 graduate of the Parker Charter School, Leyenaar was one of 16 area students participating in Mount Wachusett Community College’s eight-week STEM Starter Summer Academy. Students received up to two free college courses, textbooks, a substantial stipend, academic support and tutoring.

    “I want to be an immunologist, so I need a good background,” said Leyenaar, who plans to earn an associate degree in medical laboratory technology so he can work in the field while pursuing his bachelor’s and master’s degrees.
    Funded through a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education, the STEM Starter Sumer Academy is open to high school graduates or qualifying MWCC students who place into college-level English and math courses and are enrolling in one of MWCC’s STEM majors in the fall.

    Qualifying MWCC STEM majors include allied health, biology, biotechnology, chemistry, computer information systems, fitness leadership and exercise science, medical laboratory technology, natural resources, physics and pre-engineering.

    Courses offered during the summer academy included intermediate algebra, introduction to functions and modeling, life science for allied health, anatomy and physiology I, general chemistry II and introduction to psychology. In addition to the coursework, students helped run experiments at Rapoport Lab at Harvard Medical School, visited AbbVie medical labs in Worcester, and toured the construction site of MWCC’s new STEM building, which will open in 2016. The students also participated in MWCC’s Summer Leadership Academy.

    “Our students have had an outstanding summer and are ready to continue their studies this fall with two courses already under their belt,” said Christine Davis, MWCC’s STEM Starter Academy recruiter. Students from more than 10 area towns enrolled in the rigorous program, and tackled classes in an accelerated format that will prepare them for their careers, she said.

    Many of the academy students are also recipients of STEM SET scholarships. These awards of up to $3,500 per year are available to qualifying STEM majors through a grant the college received from the National Science Foundation.
    Gardner resident Ifra Hassan, enrolled in MWCC’s liberal arts biological studies program with the goal of continuing her studies in medicine and become a doctor. Hassan said she chose the college for its supportive environment.

    “I wanted to start my career where I will receive teachers’ support.”

    Next year, up to 30 students will be accepted into the Stem Starter Summer Academy. For more information, contact MWCC’s admission’s office at 978-630-9110 or admissions@mwcc.mass.edu.

  • 12th Annual Massachusetts STEM Summit is Tuesday, November 10

    Themed "Promising Practices, Proven Results", the day will include panel presentations, plenary speakers, and exhibitors showcasing STEM initiatives

    Mark your calendars for the 12th annual Massachusetts STEM Summit! Join us on Tuesday, November 10, 2015 at the DCU Center in Worcester!

    Themed "Promising Practices, Proven Results", the day will include panel presentations, plenary speakers, and exhibitors showcasing STEM initiatives; sharing innovative thinking; and highlighting the goals, plans, and progress of STEM policies and programs.

    Sessions will cover a broad range of topics including: early childhood, K-12, and higher education; out-of-school time programs; digital education; research and practice; innovation and entrepreneurship; workforce development and career awareness; state policy and business needs; and more.

    To see session descriptions, visit the Summit schedule.

    Registration opens at 9:00am on Wednesday, September 16. Please visit www.mass-stem-summit.org to register. The registration fee will be $50. Please note: this fee will be waived for all full-time students. Space is limited so please register early!

    The Massachusetts STEM Summit is hosted by:

    Massachusetts STEM Advisory Council
    Massachusetts Business Roundtable
    University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute

  • Photo Courtesy Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

    413 STEM Ready Academy

    MCLA program aims to inspire community college students

    NORTH ADAMS — Adrienne Wootters says when she meets community college students who transfer into her department at MCLA, they seem to know where they're going with their studies.

    "They're always really well-prepared and interested," said Wootters, a physics professor at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts.

    For the second consecutive summer, the college is hosting an immersion program in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to enrich the STEM experiences of students from three of the region's community colleges.

    The week-long 413 STEM Ready Academy, which concluded on Friday, included 25 students: nine from Berkshire Community College, and eight each from Holyoke and Greenfield community colleges.

    The program is offered at no cost; it is funded through a $239,334 grant awarded in 2013 to MCLA through the state Department of Higher Education's Performance Initiative Fund.

    "By immersing them in STEM coursework, our hope is that this will encourage them to go into a four-year program or beyond in exploring this field," said Mary Nash.

    >> Continues on BerkshireEagle.com

    Photo Courtesy Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts